All Change: A New Diagnosis

I have been sick for at least 13 years, with some symptoms going back into my childhood. At first I was told I had Post Viral Fatigue Syndrome, then later Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. (ME.) ME is also referred to as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, (CFS) although this is controversial as chronic fatigue is often a symptom of other illness. ME/CFS is a diagnosis of exclusion. That is, there is no  known cause or definitive test for it and when every other possibility is excluded the symptoms get labelled as ME. I have often wished that I had any other disease – something with a known cause, where it is not so easy for people to label you a fake or a lazy scrounger. This wish got even more intense when I went to see a psychiatrist after becoming suicidal with pain. His response was to ignore my depression and suicidal ideation and instead “diagnose” me with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, which from his point of view is a mental illness, and prescribe exercise as the cure to all my problems.

Then four years ago I became diabetic too. It wasn’t unexpected given my family history and I adapted to it pretty easily, although I resented having to change what I eat. Since I was diagnosed my diabetes has progressed rapidly and a few weeks ago I went to see a specialist because despite insulin treatment I was responding unpredictably and finding it hard to control my blood glucose. He suspected that I had a form of diabetes called MODY and had some blood samples taken for a genetic test.

On Friday I got the results of that test back and everything changed.
I don’t have MODY, I have Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness. (MIDD.) It’s caused by a mutation in mitochondrial DNA (3243 tRNA), specifically 3243A>G.

I spoke to the diabetes consultant this morning and he confirmed that what I have is the mitochondrial 3243 A>G mutation. Unfortunately he is a bit clueless about the impact of that mutation outside of diabetes and he dismissed my questions about muscle pain and weakness and about issues with taking metformin. When I first saw him I had asked if my diabetes could be the cause of the muscle pain and burning pain that I have had for years, but he was adamant that it could not be, especially since I have been diagnosed with ME for much longer than I have had diabetes. He said that he had a couple of other patients with MIDD and they had no pain so that was that.

Apart from diabetes and deafness (The deafness part is only about 75% of cases) MIDD is associated with some other symptoms. From the information sheet at the Diabetes Genes website:

Myopathy (Muscle weakness): muscle problems of either weakness or cramps may be present in around 40% of cases of MIDD.  This generally involves proximal muscles (shoulders, buttocks and thighs) which are used when climbing stairs and presents as exercise induced muscle cramps or weakness.

 And

Metformin, a commonly used treatment in diabetes is probably best avoided as Metformin is known to interfere with mitochondrial function and the risk of lactic acidosis may be increased although this has not been reported to date.

From looking at what other people with this condition have said the pain and weakness is rather understated in the above quote. The following is typical of what is actually reported.

I’ve been feeling so, so tired recently with aching legs, and I can barely get out of bed and get dressed some days, most of the time I just want to lie on the sofa and sleep. I knew MIDD could make you tired after exercise, but I didn’t realise it could make you so fatigued after not doing anything at all!

Turning to The NHS Rare Mitochondrial Disease Service for more information I found this under General Information > Exercise

Because in mitochondrial disease the cells cannot make ATP in sufficient quantity, anything that requires a lot of ATP such as exercising a muscle will mean that the body will not be able to keep up with demand. This has two main effects; firstly the muscle will become tired sooner than normal and secondly the muscle makes other compounds such as lactic acid in an attempt to keep up with energy demand. This can lead to pain and cramp in the muscles and patients often feel “like they have run a marathon” even after only moderate exercise. The temptation is to avoid all exercise so that you never get to this stage, but this is not recommended for two reasons. Firstly, it is important for general fitness to exercise and as well as exercising the muscles it is important to keep the heart and circulation healthy. Secondly, there is good evidence that if you become very unfit this will adversely affect your muscles. In many patients’ muscles there is a mixture of good and bad mitochondria and the hope is that exercise can increase the good mitochondria, boosting the level of ATP back to normal and so avoiding symptoms. At this stage this remains just a theory and there are large trials looking in to this idea. At the present time our advice is to exercise regularly at a level that feels comfortable, but without pushing yourself to the point that your muscles become painful.

But that’s not all. The Rare Mitochondrial Disease Service has another perspective on the 3243A>G mutation. It is responsible for a condition called Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes (MELAS). And it’s scaring the shit out of me.

The clinical features associated with this mutation can, as stated above, be very variable. We have a number of individuals who clearly carry the mutation who are completely asymptomatic. Other patients have very, very mild symptoms perhaps with a tendency to have diabetes or very mild deafness requiring no treatment. These patients might not be aware that they had the mutation apart from the fact that they were family members of somebody who had more serious disease. Some people with the 3243A>G mutation, also develop diabetes and deafness ultimately requiring the use of a hearing aid or requiring insulin to control their diabetes. Other patients have more severe involvement with muscle weakness sometimes affecting the peripheral muscles and sometimes affecting the muscles around the eyes. Finally there is a group of patients who do develop the MELAS syndrome, which is associated with episodes of encephalopathy . Encephalopathy is really the medical term for an episode that disturbs brain function. These disturbances can take the form of stroke- like episodes and/or seizures. This is a much more troublesome and difficult group of symptoms to control and clearly have a significant effect on people’s lifestyle.

My next step is to see my GP to talk about what all of this means for me and I will ask for a referral to the mitochondrial disease service. Unfortunately my GP is away this week so I will have to wait before I can sort anything out.
I thought finding proof of what is wrong with me would be a relief, but it’s not. Acceptance of my old diagnosis has given way to panic about my new one. All I have is questions swirling round and round in my head. The thought that keeps hitting me is that I wasn’t making this up. I wasn’t imagining it. People have been throwing out accusations and belittling my illness for so long that I had almost convinced myself I was a lazy fake, questioning if symptoms were real or just my brain tricking me. And now I know I’m not imagining it. There’s proof, right there on paper, but I almost don’t believe it. I want to feel relief but all I feel is grief.

Trapped

So many thoughts
So much I want to do

Fight the government
Save welfare and the NHS
Protect privacy and the right to protest
Write blogs about it all
Send a wake up call

I want to leave this bed
Travel to meet friends I’ve made online
Ride my motorbike again
Whizz through the countryside

I want to learn new technology
Go back to work
Make old computers work again
Be master of a server room once more

I want…
But no.
I lie here in bed
Pain
Exhaustion
A shower and some fresh clothes
All I can hope for today
Scream at the world
Silently
Through my smartphone

I am trapped
I am trapped

Cough, cough

It’s been a couple of weeks since my last blog post. That’s because reality decided to reassert itself in my life and I’ve been reminded quite forcibly that I am, in fact, ill. I never seem to notice when my health has been good until afterwards when it goes bad again and then while I am stuck in bed I realise that I’ve been out of bed quite a lot in the preceding few weeks. I’ve acquired a cold and a cough that has now turned into a painful chest infection. The result is that I have spent the majority of my time in bed for the last two weeks and my days are punctuated by fits of coughing that leave me seriously dazed afterwards. I visited the doctor today and started antibiotics so hopefully it will clear up soon.

I haven’t been completely inactive though. I’ve visited my doctor, which is a fairly big effort in itself for me. I have had quite a few phone calls with my solicitor dealing with aspects of my case against the DWP, and been sent mountains of documents to read to do with that. I have been to my first parish council meeting as a councillor, and managed to get drafted onto the planning committee and been to a meeting of that too. (Not actually as much work as it sounds.) I have even managed a few hours of computer gaming recently, something which I haven’t been able to face much while my mental health has been bad. The majority of my time though has been spent trying to stay awake but not really managing to do much more than slump in bed and stare at twitter, too tired to even tweet much compared to a few weeks ago.

And on top of that, I’ve been sent an ESA50 form – Limited capability for work questionnaire. It had to happen eventually, it’s been nearly two years since my last work capability assessment. The form arrived a couple of weeks ago and I think I subconsciously chose to bury it under a mess of paperwork so that I didn’t have to think about it. Unfortunately that means that I haven’t got very long left to go through the soul-destroying process of filling it in. I had better drug myself up and go and get on with it instead of procrastinating through blogging.

Pain pain pain

Last night was a bad night. I had a little less than three hours of sleep and  by 7am my pain levels were high. Not so high as to have me curled up whimpering and shaking as sometimes happens, or enough to make me cry out, but enough to ensure that I definitely couldn’t go back to sleep and found it hard to concentrate on anything else.

It’s my feet that hurt the most today. Specifically, the tops of my feet which are aching horribly, as are my fingers and the backs of my hands. My arms hurt too, with the aching seeming to branch out from my hands and shoulders into the arms. Strangely, my elbows don’t hurt.  My legs feel like I’ve been beaten up or possibly run over, which is about normal for me but with some extra cramp and shooting pains in my calf muscles. The cramp occasionally stabs at the underside of my feet too. Now that I’m typing I realise that the muscles in my thumbs hurt quite a lot. My usual constant headache might be in the mix somewhere but it’s been masked by more pressing pain elsewhere. Over the last few minutes a familiar burning pain has overtaken the aching and started to spread through my body. It’s the burning that makes me curl up and wish to die, to scream in pain. I desperately hope that it stops before that point. Back in early 2011 I had the burning all the time and I had to take pregabalin (Lyrica) to control it. I didn’t enjoy either part of that experience.

I have had drugs to try and help, of course. At 7am I had 500mg Naproxen, 1g Paracetamol and 30mg codeine. It made no difference that I can tell. I could take more codeine but the result will be that I can’t think and get really drowsy but lie awake in a nauseous opiate haze without actually sleeping. I have distracted myself through the last hour by re-watching episodes of The IT Crowd but my concentration is slipping now and I’ve turned it off.

I get pain most days although not to this extent. The pain has always been put down to my diagnosis of M.E. with the more recent burning possibly being diabetic neuropathy but while it’s a name for it, it doesn’t actually explain what’s causing the pain. It’s just labelled and then ignored. Maybe if I knew why I was in pain it would be easier to accept. I know lots of other people who have similar experiences so I don’t really know why I’m writing this other than to have a moan. Maybe that’s enough of a reason.

Lessons from a troll

My experiences in the last couple of days have highlighted a few things.

It is hard to tell the different between someone who is saying things just to provoke you (a troll) and someone who genuinely believes what they are saying and is trying to convince you. Sometimes they believe what they are saying but are still trying to provoke a reaction for their own amusement. Indigo Jo Blogs sets out a case that this kind of trolling is simply bullying in RIP trolling isn’t the worst kind. Some people are of the opinion that telling people with M.E. that their illness isn’t real and that they don’t deserve help is actually gaslighting – a form of abuse through making people doubt their own minds. This kind of approach seems common in politics as Lisa Ansell wrote in Trolling as political debate.

Many on the right of politics believe that welfare should not exist. Instead they believe that individuals should have savings and pay for their own insurance privately to cover them against unemployment and being unable to work through illness and disability, and for healthcare. The problems with this approach are many but it seems impossible to convince proponents of the idea that it will lead to suffering and homelessness, or perhaps they just don’t care about that.

There is still a big problem with people believing that ME and Fibromyalgia are somehow not real or are minor or trivial. This has been fuelled by articles and blog posts from tabloid papers. Both are defined as neurological physical diseases by the World Health Organisation but this is irrelevant in deciding if they are real anyway – even if they were caused by mental health problems at the core they would still be just as disabling. It is an absurd suggestion that anyone would want M.E. or would voluntarily stay in bed for most or all of the day, every day, in isolation, or voluntarily use a wheelchair or a walking stick all the time when going out. These would be stupid things to inflict on yourself for the benefits available, if you even manage to get them.

Some people seem to believe that if they can work through their illness or disability then anyone who does not work must simply not be trying hard enough. They seem to have no understanding that the amount a person is affected by a particular health problem can vary massively between different people and different problems. It seems inconceivable to them that an invisible illness could be more disabling in its effects than a cancer or surgery of some sort. They think that particular health problems, like cancer and chemotherapy treatment, are the ultimate in human suffering and that nothing else can be worse. I know a few people on chemotherapy and I know that it is a horrific experience, but it isn’t the only thing that can make someone so sick – especially if someone is on a low dose.

I captured some of what was said to me recently using Storify, embedded here. (Click here if it doesn’t show below after a few seconds.) Warning, it does contain strong swearing on my part where I got too frustrated to hold back.

Continue reading “Lessons from a troll”

DLA Story

I’ve been sick for more than a decade. I have struggled to keep working for as much of that as I can, even starting my own computer maintenance business, but I have spent a lot of time unable to work. A few years ago I claimed Disability Living Allowance as I had mobility problems and needed care. I was initially turned down and although I eventually won on appeal the process took more than a year.

That was awarded for two years from the date that I first applied and so it soon ran out and required a fresh application. Unfortunately I was too ill to face completing the fifty page form, collecting medical evidence and going through the medical check again and since I was working, I let it go despite being entitled to it.

In August 2010 I became seriously ill once again and eventually in October 2011 I accepted that I wasn’t going to improve any time soon and so I applied for DLA again. This time I received help from the Worcester branch of the DIAL network who asked me questions and filled in my forms for me. The process was still long and exhausting but at least it got done. A few days ago I heard that I had been awarded DLA with a high rate mobility allowance and middle rate care allowance for a period of five years. I was taken by surprise about this as other people with M.E. often have to take their application to appeal.

DLA will make a huge difference to my life. The first thing I did was use the 17 weeks of backdated DLA to pay off my credit card, which had been racking up debt because of the extra costs of living with my illness. Last week I ordered a car from the Motability scheme, which I will pay for by handing over all of my DLA mobility allowance – about £50 per week – for the duration of the three year lease. Having a car will mean that I can leave the house – which I rarely leave at all apart from to go to medical appointments – and I will be able to go shopping with my wife, collect my own medicines from the pharmacy, visit the doctor and the hospital without having to take my father out of work to drive me there, and visit friends who I can only talk to over the telephone or internet at the moment. This car will open up a whole new life for me.

In addition to the car my DLA will pay for things like pre-prepared food that I can access when my wife is unable to be at home to care for me, and to cover the costs of the more expensive specific foods that I need if I am to keep my meals down. It will also pay for extra energy costs for the hot baths that I need to get some pain relief in my aching burning muscles, and air conditioning when the summer heat makes me so ill that I collapse.

In short, my DLA will be life-changing. The government’s plans to replace it under the welfare reform bill and cut 20% of the cost by withholding it from people that desperately need it are a dangerous and heartless thing. Please, sign the petition to pause the welfare reform bill.

Reply from PCC about Rod Liddle on fibromyalgia and ME

A few weeks ago I made a complaint to the Press Complaint Commission about a blog post written on The Spectator website by Rod Liddle. (Blog posts are covered if on a website of a print publication.) He asserted that fibromyalgia

“is another one of those imaginary afflictions claimed by malingering mentals.”

He went on to say

Things Which Definitely Are Not Illnesses or Diseases: 

Fibromyalgia
Addiction to alcohol
Addiction to drugs
Obesity
Being a bit odd
M.E.
Hepatitis contracted when behaving in an inappropriate manner
Stress
Wearing spectacles
Addiction to sex

This is the complaint that I sent in to the Press Complaints Commission. (And I must thank them for providing me with a copy as I had lost mine.)

Explanation : The article breaches the code of practice as it is inaccurate and misleading.

The article lists Fibromyalgia and M.E. under the heading “Things Which Definitely Are Not Illnesses or Diseases”

It is factually incorrect to state that these are not illnesses. Fibromyalgia is listed in the World Health Organisation’s Internationa l Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems under M79 Other soft tissue disorders, not elsewhere classified, as M79.7, Fibromyalgia. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E.) is listed under G93 Other disorders of the nervous system as G93.3 Postviral fatigue syndrome – Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis.

The article states “[Fibromyalgia] is another one of those imaginary afflictions claimed by malingering mentals.”

The author has no grounds to claim that fibromyalgia is imaginary, as it recognised as a real physical illness by the WHO. He also has no grounds to use the phrase “malingering mentals.” Fibromyalgia is not a mental illness, and even if it were, a mental illness is a real illness and is not “malingering.” This phrase is incorrect and is disablist hate speech. The errors in this article contribute directly to hate crime, abuse, and verbal abuse against sick and disabled people, of which there has been a significant increase in rece nt months. (As reported by Scope at http://www.scope.org.uk/news/matthew-parris-and-times)

Clauses : The article breaches clause 1 part 1 of the code of practice.
i) The Press must take care not to publish inaccurate, misleading or distorted information, including pictures.

And here is their response.

Commission’s decision in the case of

Various v The Spectator 

The complainants considered that an article that stated that Fibromyalgia (FM) was not a real illness and that sufferers were “malingering mentals” was inaccurate and discriminatory.

The Commission acknowledged that the article was controversial and that many readers would not agree with its content, however, it made clear that columnists are entitled to express their personal views and comments, provided they are clearly distinguished from fact. It noted that the column was written in the first person and as such, the views expressed were clearly attributable to the columnist.

The Commission considered first the complaint under Clause 1 (Accuracy) of the Code. The Commission acknowledged that the complainants considered that the article’s reference to the columnist being a doctor and the statement that Fibromyalgia (FM) and other recognised diseases were not “real” was inaccurate. The Commission considered that readers in general would understand that the reference to the columnist being a doctor was intended to be a facetious reference rather than a statement of fact that he was a qualified medical practitioner. As such they would not be misled. Furthermore, the Commission considered that the categorization of the illnesses clearly represented the columnist’s opinion on the conditions – indeed he clearly qualified his views on Fibromyalgia by asserting he “may be wrong”. The Commission considered that readers would understand that it reflected the personal, albeit caustic views of the columnist and would not be misled by the article; as such it did not establish a breach of Clause 1 (Accuracy) of the Code.

The Commission then turned to the alleged breach of Clause 12 (Discrimination) of the Code. It appreciated the reasons why the complainants considered the article was distasteful and prejudicial and acknowledged that many readers would take offence at the article; however this did not render a breach of Clause 12. The Commission made clear that under Clause 12 (i), newspapers must avoid prejudicial or pejorative reference to an individual’s physical or mental illness or disability; the clause does not cover references to groups or categories of people. In this instance, the article did not make reference to the physical or mental illness or disability of a particular individual but rather referred to Fibromyalgia sufferers in general. While the Commission understood the concerns raised by the complainants, it did not establish that Clause 12 (i) of the Code had been breached.

Finally, the Commission considered the complainants’ concerns that the magazine published offensive material. It acknowledged that the complainants found the article highly offensive; however, it made clear that the terms of the Editors’ Code of Practice do not address issues of taste and offence. The Code is designed to address the potentially competing rights of freedom of expression and other rights of individuals, such as privacy. Newspapers and magazines have editorial freedom to publish what they consider to be appropriate provided that the rights of individuals – enshrined in the terms of the Code which specifically defines and protects these rights – are not compromised.  To come to an inevitably subjective judgement as to whether such material is tasteless or offensive would amount to the Commission acting as a moral arbiter, which can lead to censorship. It could not, therefore, comment on this aspect of the complaint further.

 

Mental ME

I have depression. I get stuck in a spiral of negative thoughts until I reach the point of wanting to die. It happens often, and has been going on for about a year. A few months ago I asked my GP to refer me to a mental health team for more in-depth help as anti-depressants alone were not working.  My GP wrote to the mental health team asking for help with my suicidal thoughts, and she listed some of my circumstances too – imminent homelessness, massive housing benefit screw-up, and suffering from ME and lots of other diseases.

The three times that I have seen a psychiatrist have been rubbish. I talked about that in a previous blog post. Basically, the psychiatrist focussed on my fatigue and would talk about nothing else. I even said to him “I’ve had M.E. for eleven years and know how to manage it, but I really need to know how to stop the loops of negative thought and the suicidal thoughts.” I was ignored. He decided to treat my fatigue by giving me amitriptyline, which is the first drug used in cases of M.E. even though I have tried many similar drugs over the years to no effect. Amitriptyline caused me to lose two entire weeks because it made me sleep all day every day, so I cut it down and then stopped it.

I went back to my GP to find an alternative to this useless psychiatrist. She gave me a copy of the letter that he had sent to her. Here is what it says:

Diagnosis: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Current Mental State/Progress:
Unchanged, symptoms of fatigue.

Risk profile (+Crisis Plan if applicable):
Nil.

There is no mention of the periods of despair, the suicidal thoughts, the risk to myself that my GP had told them about. Just a diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I have pointed out on this blog many times before that my illness is ME/CFS which is a physical condition. As such, my psychiatrist has no business writing CFS as my diagnosis for my mental health problems because it’s not a mental health problem.

I had a bit of a freak out this morning because I suddenly realised that this psychiatrist will be asked about my condition for my application for Disability Living Allowance. That could be disastrous if he tells them his version of what is wrong with me rather than my official diagnosis of M.E. by the neurologist that I saw years ago. However, after panicking for a few hours I have managed to call the mental health hospital and explain my problem. The manager there was extremely helpful and nice about it. My next appointment there will be with the Consultant Psychiatrist who is in charge rather than the idiot that I have previously seen, and because my DLA claim is imminent I will be called in earlier if there are any cancellations. She has also made a note that they must see me before replying to any letters about my DLA claim.

Hopefully that’s one less thing to worry about. The last thing I need is clueless doctors making my life even more stressful.

Invisible illness and irrational hatred

 

Living with an invisible illness often means being under constant suspicion of being workshy and a malingerer, and of committing benefit fraud. Ignorant people often attribute physical but invisible illness to mental health problems, and then claim that they are not real problems. This is usually wrong on two counts, since not only are many of those illnesses not mental health problems, but mental health problems can be just as real and disabling as any physical problem.

Unfortunately some of these ignorant people have a platform to spread their ignorance and hatred through. One such person is Rod Liddle, who writes in The Spectator. After being contacted by the Fibromyalgia Society he launched an attack on the disease, saying that  “it is another one of those imaginary afflictions claimed by malingering mentals.” He went on to present a list of “Things Which Definitely Are Not Illnesses or Diseases and included Fibromyalgia and M.E. in that list. I have complained to the Press Complaints Commission about this article, and this is the text of my complaint.

 

 The article breaches clause 1 part 1 of the code of practice.
i) The Press must take care not to publish inaccurate, misleading or distorted information, including pictures.

The article breaches the code of practice as it is inaccurate and misleading.

The article lists Fibromyalgia and M.E. under the heading “Things Which Definitely Are Not Illnesses or Diseases”

It is factually incorrect to state that these are not illnesses. Fibromyalgia is listed in the World Health Organisation’s International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems under M79 Other soft tissue disorders, not elsewhere classified, as M79.7, Fibromyalgia. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E.) is listed under G93 Other disorders of the nervous system as G93.3 Postviral fatigue syndrome – Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis.

The article states “[Fibromyalgia] is another one of those imaginary afflictions claimed by malingering mentals.”

The author has no grounds to claim that fibromyalgia is imaginary, as it recognised as a real physical illness by the WHO. He also has no grounds to use the phrase “malingering mentals.” Fibromyalgia is not a mental illness, and even if it were, a mental illness is a real illness and is not “malingering.” This phrase is incorrect and is disablist hate speech. The errors in this article contribute directly to hate crime, abuse, and verbal abuse against sick and disabled people, of which there has been a significant increase in recent months. (As reported by Scope at http://www.scope.org.uk/news/matthew-parris-and-times)

 

I have saved a Freezepage copy of the offending article in case it disapears.

http://www.freezepage.com/1317921668VVYABLRSUZ

You can make your own complaint to the PCC on their website.

http://www.pcc.org.uk/complaints/process.html

I recommend this interesting blog post on the different reactions to visible and invisible illness.

http://e-s-d.deviantart.com/journal/35186426/

 

Aaaarrrrrggggghhhhh

I’m struggling quite a lot at the moment. I’ve recently started Amitriptyline, as well as increasing my Escitalopram, and for the first week I basically slept all the time. I’m still getting bouts of despair and severe depression, and spending a lot of time stuck in bed. Pain is down but dizziness, brain fog and problems walking are up. One of the casualties of all this has been my ability to write in detail about the subjects that I want to. Actually focussing on the detail is a massive problem. I can chat online, but I can’t write proper blog posts.

Some of the things that I really want to write about but can’t include:

  • The possible causes of ME, viral and mental, and the research into them.
  • Visiting a psychiatrist who believes my ME is a mental disease, and asking how I’m supposed to get my depression fixed without my ME being made worse by this idiot.
  • The Welfare Reform bill and the Health and Social Care bill, the problems, and how to fight them.
  • Being accurate in activism; not spreading rumours, and avoiding exaggeration.
  • How the Left and the Right stifle each others speech, or not. (I’ve written this, but can’t finish editing it and write the conclusion.)
  • Report on my experience at an Atos Work Capability Assessment, and Professor Harrington’s latest antics in policing them. (I was declared unfit to work, if you didn’t know.)
  • Discuss human rights.
  • Basing government policy on actual evidence instead of ideology and greed.
Those are just the ones I started writing, never mind the other ones that I haven’t attempted yet. For now, though, blog posts only come out when something prompts my mind to focus enough on one topic so that I HAVE to get the words written.